Dr. Adele E. Gottfried joined CSUN in 1978, and was promoted to Professor in 1984. Her honors include CSUN Outstanding Faculty Award (2009), CSUN University Research Fellow (2008-09), WPA Social Responsibility Award (2011), and Fellow of AERA, APA, APS, WPA. Her service includes Department Chair, coordinating department programs, and committee work at all levels, with many in leadership roles. The Dean appointed her as inaugural Director of Research Enhancement (2010-present), a trailblazing position, establishing a research culture including website, colloquium series, AERA reception, publication panel, and a videotape project for University Fellows. As a scholar and researcher, Dr. Gottfried conducted longitudinal, pioneering research on academic motivation, authoring approximately 200 publications/ presentations. She served as book series editor and associate editor, and continues to serve on editorial boards. One of her publications was the basis for a California Supreme Court ruling. Her teaching has been highly rated and she has mentored students, some pursuing doctoral/ professional degrees. Dr. Gottfried plans to maintain her research and scholarship after retirement.

  • Ph.D. 1975, Graduate School of the City University of New York
  • M.A. 1968, University of Chicago
  • B.A. 1967, Queens College
  • Licensed Psychologist , State of California

    This person has not added any Research Interests.


Class # Catalog # Title Days Time (Start-End) Location Syllabus
Loading class information...
Loading class information...

Day Hours Location Description
Loading office hours...
Loading office hours...

Presentations

Gottfried, A. E. (2011, April). Searching for Motivation from Childhood through Adulthood: Findings and Implications of a Longitudinal Investigation across Two Decades. Invited presentation at the 2011 Western Psychological Association Convention, Los Angeles.
Title Searching for Motivation from Childhood through Adulthood: Findings and Implications of a Longitudinal Investigation across Two Decades
Collaborators
Presentation Date 2011
Location 2011 Western Psychological Association Convention, Los Angeles
Citation Gottfried, A. E. (2011, April). Searching for Motivation from Childhood through Adulthood: Findings and Implications of a Longitudinal Investigation across Two Decades. Invited presentation at the 2011 Western Psychological Association Convention, Los Angeles.
Abstract This presentation provided an overview of my research program on academic intrinsic motivation with regard to: developmental trends across the school years, the role of environment and parental motivational practices, and relationships to academic achievement.

Articles

Gottfried, A. E., Preston, K. S. J., Gottfried, A. W., Oliver, P. H., Delany, D. E., & Ibrahim, S. M. (2016) Pathways from parental stimulation of children’s curiosity to high school science course accomplishments and science career interest and skill, International Journal of Science Education, 38:12, 1972-1995, DOI: 10.1080/09500693.2016.1220690
Title Pathways from parental stimulation of children's curiosity to high school science course accomplishments and science career interest and skill
Collaborators K. S. J. Preston, A. W. Gottfried, P. Oliver, D. E. Delany, & S. M. Ibraham
Publish Date 2016
Journal International Journal of Science Education Routledge
Publisher Routledge
Citation Gottfried, A. E., Preston, K. S. J., Gottfried, A. W., Oliver, P. H., Delany, D. E., & Ibrahim, S. M. (2016) Pathways from parental stimulation of children’s curiosity to high school science course accomplishments and science career interest and skill, International Journal of Science Education, 38:12, 1972-1995, DOI: 10.1080/09500693.2016.1220690
Abstract Curiosity is fundamental to scientific inquiry and pursuance. Parents are important in encouraging children’s involvement in science.This longitudinal study examined pathways from parental stimulation of children’s curiosity per se to their science acquisition (SA). A latent variable of SA was indicated by the inter-related variables of high school science course accomplishments, career interest, and skill. A conceptual model investigated parental stimulation of children’s curiosity as related to SA via science intrinsic motivation and science achievement. Parental stimulation of curiosity at age 8 years comprised exposing children to new experiences, promoting curiosity, encouraging asking questions, and taking children to a museum. Intrinsic motivation was measured at ages 9, 10, and 13 years, and achievement at ages 9, 10, and 11 years. Structural equation modelling was used for analyses. Controlling for socio-economic status, parental stimulation of curiosity bore positive and significant relations to science intrinsic motivation and achievement, which in turn related to SA. Gender neither related to stimulation of curiosity nor contributed to the model. Findings highlight the importance of parental stimulation of children’s curiosity in facilitating trajectories into science, and relevance to science education is discussed.
Gottfried, A. E., Nylund-Gibson, K., Gottfried, A. W., Morovati, D., & Gonzalez, A. M. (2016). Trajectories from academic intrinsic motivation to need for      cognition and educational attainment.  The Journal of Educational Research. DOI: 10.1080/00220671.2016.1171199
Title Trajectories from academic intrinsic motivation to need for cognition and educational attainment.
Collaborators Gottfried, A. E., Nylund-Gibson, K., Gottfried, A. W., Morovati, D., & Gonzalez, A. M.
Publish Date 2016
Journal The Journal of Educational Research Taylor Francis
Publisher Taylor Francis
Citation Gottfried, A. E., Nylund-Gibson, K., Gottfried, A. W., Morovati, D., & Gonzalez, A. M. (2016). Trajectories from academic intrinsic motivation to need for      cognition and educational attainment.  The Journal of Educational Research. DOI: 10.1080/00220671.2016.1171199
Abstract This long-term longitudinal study addressed the theoretical underpinning of academic intrinsic motivation (AIM) from childhood through adolescence, to need for cognition (NFC) and educational attainment (EA) during adulthood. AIM was measured from 9 to 17 years old, NFC and EA at 29 years old, and IQ at 8 years old. Latent change and growth mixture modeling were utilized. These models complemented each other, revealing that initial motivational status significantly related to both outcomes. Growth mixture modeling elaborated the findings by identifying distinctive subgroups in initial status and developmental change. In contrast to children with initially higher AIM, those starting lower declined resulting in lower NFC and EA. IQ was controlled in these analyses. Findings enhance understanding of trajectories across two decades of development, indicating that students’ early motivation relates to adulthood NFC and EA. Implications for educational practices are discussed.
Preston, K. S. J., Parral, S. N., Gottfried, A. W., Oliver, P. H., Gottfried, A. E., Ibrahim, S. M., & Delany, D. (2015).  Applying the nominal response model within a   longitudinal framework to construct the Positive Family Relationships Scale.    Educational and Psychological Measurement, 75. 901-930.
Title Applying the nominal response model within a longitudinal framework to construct the Positive Family Relationships Scale
Collaborators Preston, K.S.J., Parral, S,N., Gottfried, A. W., Oliver, P. H., Ibrahim, S. M., & Delany, D. E.
Publish Date 2015
Journal Educational and Psychological Measurement Sage
Publisher Sage
Citation Preston, K. S. J., Parral, S. N., Gottfried, A. W., Oliver, P. H., Gottfried, A. E., Ibrahim, S. M., & Delany, D. (2015).  Applying the nominal response model within a   longitudinal framework to construct the Positive Family Relationships Scale.    Educational and Psychological Measurement, 75. 901-930.
Abstract A psychometric analysis was conducted using the nominal response model (NRM) under the Item Response Theory (IRT) framework to construct the Positive Family Relationships (PFR) scale. This scale was constructed within a long-term longitudinal framework spanning middle-childhood through adolescence. Items tapping this construct were completed annually by mothers when children were ages 9 – 17 years.  The scale measures a construct customized for each age with uniquely informative items consisting exclusively of discriminating response categories as evaluated using the NRM.  By employing longitudinal data, the study is innovative in implementing the method of test equating to a psychological construct across nine assessments spanning eight years.  Future research pertaining to validity and applications are discussed.
Gottfried, A. W., Schlackman, J., Gottfried, A. E., & Martinez, A. S. (2015).  Parental provision of early literacy environment as related to reading and educational   outcomes across the academic life-span.  Parenting: Science and Practice, 15, 24-38.
Title Parental provision of early literacy environment as related to reading and educational outcomes across the academic life-span.
Collaborators A. W. Gottfried, J. Schlackman, A. Boutin-Martinez
Publish Date 2015
Journal Parenting: Science and Practice Taylor & Francis
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Citation Gottfried, A. W., Schlackman, J., Gottfried, A. E., & Martinez, A. S. (2015).  Parental provision of early literacy environment as related to reading and educational   outcomes across the academic life-span.  Parenting: Science and Practice, 15, 24-38.
Abstract In a longitudinal study spanning 28-years, this research examined the long-term effect of children’s home literacy environment during infancy and early childhood on their subsequent reading intrinsic motivation and reading achievement from childhood through adolescence, and educational attainment during adulthood. Literacy environment was assessed from infancy through preschool with the amount of time mothers read to their children and the number of books and reading materials in the home. Analyzing the data using structual equation modeling, literacy environment was examined as related to children’s reading intrinsic motivation (measured with the Reading scale of the CAIMI) and reading achievement across childhood through adolescence, and educational attainment during adulthood. Results demonstrated that it was the amount of time mothers spent reading to their children, not the number of books and reading materials in the home, that was significantly related to reading intrinsic motivation, reading achievement, and educational attainment.  Specifically, when mothers spent more time reading to their children across infancy through early childhood, their children’s reading intrinsic motivation and reading achievement were also significantly higher across childhood through adolescence.  In turn, higher reading intrinsic motivation and reading achievement were significantly related to educational attainment during adulthood.  These findings occurred above and beyond mothers’ educational level. Reading to children during infancy and early childhood proved to have significant and positive long-term benefits for children’s reading intrinsic motivation, reading achievement, and adulthood educational attainment that extended across the academic life-span from childhood through adulthood.  The specific experience of being read to during the early years has long-term educational benefits that traverse the academic life-span through its relationships with reading intrinsic motivation and reading achievement. Implications for practice are that parental reading to children is a significant factor that needs to be encouraged as early as infancy. It is of paramount importance to disseminate this knowledge to parents (mothers and fathers as well as other caregivers) and develop methods and practices that encourage them to read on their own accord to their young children as those parents who do so voluntarily are likely to continuously furnish and support literacy engagement activities.  This research extends Dr. Gottfried's research program on the role of parental involvement and home environment, in the development of children's academic intrinsic motivation.
















Sy, S. R., Gottfried, A. W., Gottfried, A. E. (2013). A transactional model of parental involvement and children's achievement from early childhood through adolescence.  Parenting: Science and Practice. 13, 133-152.
Title A Transactional Model of Parental Involvement and Children's Achievement from Early Childhood through Adolescence
Collaborators Susan R. Sy, Allen W. Gottfried
Publish Date 2013
Journal Parenting: Science and Practice Taylor & Francis
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Citation Sy, S. R., Gottfried, A. W., Gottfried, A. E. (2013). A transactional model of parental involvement and children's achievement from early childhood through adolescence.  Parenting: Science and Practice. 13, 133-152.
Abstract Objective. The transactional relations between two types of parental home involvement, academic instruction and academic socialization, and children's reading achievement from early childhood through adolescence were examined in a longitudinal study. Academic instruction involves one-on-one interactions between parent and child that target the development of specific academic skills, and academic socialization involves parents' promotion of academic values, beliefs, and expectations. Design. The sample was based on an ongoing long-term longitudinal study, and included 122 children (approximately equal in gender) and their families. This study included data collected from ages 3 to 17 years, employing a variety of direct and indirect assessments Results. Findings showed that the two types of parental home involvement are distinct, related, and highly stable from early childhood through adolescence and both types of parental home involvement show transactional relationships with children's reading achievement over time. Conclusion.  This study contributes to the literature by elucidating the stability of parental academic instruction and socialization as well as their transactional relationships with children’s achievement within a single integrated model from early childhood through adolescence.
Gottfried, A. E., Marcoulides, G. A., Gottfried, A. W., & Oliver, Pamella. (2013). Longitudinal pathways from math intrinsic motivation and achievement to math course accomplishments and educational attainment.  Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness, 6, 68-92.
Title Longitudinal Pathways from Math Intrinsic Motivation and Achievement to Math Course Accomplishments and Educational Attainment
Collaborators George Marcoulides, Allen Gottfried, Pamella Oliver
Publish Date 2013
Journal Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness Routledge
Publisher Routledge
Citation Gottfried, A. E., Marcoulides, G. A., Gottfried, A. W., & Oliver, Pamella. (2013). Longitudinal pathways from math intrinsic motivation and achievement to math course accomplishments and educational attainment.  Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness, 6, 68-92.
Abstract Across 20-years, pathways from math intrinsic motivation and achievement (ages 9 - 17) to high school math course accomplishments and educational attainment (age 29) were analyzed. Academic intrinsic motivation was the theoretical foundation. To determine how initial status and change in motivation and achievement related to course accomplishments and educational attainment, a latent curve model was fit to data from the Fullerton Longitudinal Study. Levels of motivation and achievement at 9 had positive, direct, and mutually indirect paths to course accomplishments.  Dual declines in motivation and achievement related to course accomplishments, directly for achievement, and indirectly for motivation via achievement.  Greater decline corresponded to fewer course accomplishments which in turn predicted, and served as a mediator to educational attainment.  Implications are discussed.
Gottfried, Adele. E., et al. (2011). Motivational roots of leadership: A longitudinal study from childhood through adulthood. The Leadership Quarterly, 22, 510-519. In special issue of The Leadership Quarterly on “Longitudinal Investigations of Leader Development.”
Title Motivational roots of leadership: A longitudinal study from childhood through adulthood
Collaborators
Publish Date 2011
Journal The Leadership Quarterly
Citation Gottfried, Adele. E., et al. (2011). Motivational roots of leadership: A longitudinal study from childhood through adulthood. The Leadership Quarterly, 22, 510-519. In special issue of The Leadership Quarterly on “Longitudinal Investigations of Leader Development.”
Abstract The present study elucidates developmental roots of leadership by investigating how motivation from childhood through adolescence is linked to motivation to lead in adulthood. Results showed considerable and significant continuity between academic intrinsic motivation and motivation to lead, indicating that adults with greater enjoyment of leadership per se, and who are motivated to lead without regard to external consequences, were significantly more intrinsically motivated from childhood through adolescence. Implications for developing motivation in leaders are advanced.
Gottfried, A. E., Marcoulides, G. A., Gottfried, A. W., Oliver, P. (2009). A latent curve model of parental motivational practices and developmental decline in math and science academic intrinsic motivation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 729-739.                                                                                               
Title A latent curve model of parental motivational practices and developmental
Collaborators
Publish Date 2009
Journal Journal of Educational Psychology
Citation Gottfried, A. E., Marcoulides, G. A., Gottfried, A. W., Oliver, P. (2009). A latent curve model of parental motivational practices and developmental decline in math and science academic intrinsic motivation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 729-739.                                                                                               
Abstract A longitudinal approach was used to examine the effects of parental task-intrinsic and task-extrinsic motivational practices on academic intrinsic motivation in the subject areas of math and science. Parental task-intrinsic practices comprise encouragement of children’s pleasure and engagement in the learning process, whereas task-extrinsic practices comprise parents’ provision of external rewards and consequences contingent on children’s task performance. A conditional latent curve model was fit to data from the Fullerton Longitudinal Study (A. W. Gottfried, A. E. Gottfried, & D. W. Guerin, 2006), with academic intrinsic motivation in math and science assessed from ages 9 to 17 and parental motivational practices measured when children were age 9. The results indicated that task-intrinsic practices were beneficial with regard to children’s initial levels of motivation at age 9 as well as with regard to motivational decline through age 17. Conversely, parents’ use of task-extrinsic practices was adverse with regard to children’s motivation both at age 9 and across the 8-year interval. Theoretical implications of the findings with regard to academic intrinsic motivation are discussed.



















Gottfried, Adele. E.  (1986). Children's Academic Intrinsic Motivation Inventory.  (CAIMI).    Lutz, FL:  Psychological Assessment Resources.
Title Children's Academic Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (CAIMI)
Collaborators
Publish Date 1986
Journal Psychologcal Assessment Resources
Publisher Psychologcal Assessment Resources
Citation Gottfried, Adele. E.  (1986). Children's Academic Intrinsic Motivation Inventory.  (CAIMI).    Lutz, FL:  Psychological Assessment Resources.
Abstract ,The CAIMI assesses academic intrinsic motivation in school subject areas as well as for school in general, from childhood through adolescence. It is avaiilable from Psychological Assessment Resources, www.parinc.com.
A downward extension for grades 1 to 3,the Young Children's Academic Inventory (YCAIMI) and upward extension for high school students, the CAIMI-HS version have been developed, and for more information about these please contact Dr. Adele Gottfried.

Chapters

Gottfried, A. E. (in press) Motivation (Intrinsic, Extrinsic). In M. Bornstein, Ed.The SAGE Encyclopedia of Lifespan Human Development. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications                                                                                                            
Title Motivation (Intrinsic, Extrinsic)
Collaborators
Publish Date 2016
Book The SAGE Encyclopedia of Lifespan Human Development Sage Publications
Publisher Sage Publications
Citation Gottfried, A. E. (in press) Motivation (Intrinsic, Extrinsic). In M. Bornstein, Ed.The SAGE Encyclopedia of Lifespan Human Development. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications                                                                                                            
Abstract This chapter presents an overview of intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivation, developmental trends of such motivation across childhood through adulthood, and relationships to academic success.  The role of environment is presented with implications for practice.
Gottfried, A. E. (2016). Intrinsic Motivation and Goals.  Invited chapter in H.  Friedman (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Mental Health, 2nd Edition. Vol 2, Waltham, MA: Academic Press, pp. 417-422.
Title Intrinsic Motivation and Goals
Collaborators
Publish Date 2015
Book H. Friedman and R. Riggio (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Mental Health, 2nd. edition Elsevier
Publisher Elsevier
Citation Gottfried, A. E. (2016). Intrinsic Motivation and Goals.  Invited chapter in H.  Friedman (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Mental Health, 2nd Edition. Vol 2, Waltham, MA: Academic Press, pp. 417-422.
Abstract Academic intrinsic motivation concerns the enjoyment of learning for its own sake without receiving external rewards, and intrinsic motivation is recognized as being important for individuals’ well-being and mental health. From childhood through adulthood, a substantial body of research shows that academic intrinsic motivation is a significant factor with regard to academic and educational well-being.  Individuals with higher levels of academic intrinsic motivation evidence pervasively greater and consistently higher academic and educational competence, and leadership.  On the other hand, individuals with lower academic intrinsic motivation, fare less well, and may become at-risk for adverse outcomes.  Development of academic intrinsic motivation across childhood and adolescence is presented, and trends that contribute to both positive and negative long-term outcomes are discussed.  Finally, home and school environments play a role in the stimulation of academic intrinsic motivation, and suggestions for intervention are advanced.
Gottfried, A et al. (2011). Paths from gifted motivation to leadership. In S. E. Murphy & R. J. Reichard (Eds.). Early Development and Leadership: Building the Next Generation of Leaders (pp. 71-91). New York: Psychology Press/Routledge.
Title Paths from gifted motivation to leadership
Collaborators
Publish Date 2011
Book Early Development and Leadership: Building the Next Generation of Leaders New York: Psychology Press/Routledge
Publisher New York: Psychology Press/Routledge
Citation Gottfried, A et al. (2011). Paths from gifted motivation to leadership. In S. E. Murphy & R. J. Reichard (Eds.). Early Development and Leadership: Building the Next Generation of Leaders (pp. 71-91). New York: Psychology Press/Routledge.
Abstract The research reported in this chapter indicates the strong positive role of students’ gifted academic intrinsic motivation with regard to undertaking leadership positions in high school extracurricular activities. Pathways from gifted motivation to leadership are discussed, as well as implications for developing student academic intrinsic motivation are advanced.
Gottfried, A. E., & Gottfried, A. W. (2009). Development of gifted motivation:    Longitudinal research and applications.  In L. Shavinina (Ed.), International   Handbook of Giftedness and Talent. Part 1, (pp. 617-631). Springer Science+Business Media.
Title Development of gifted motivation: Longitudinal research and applications
Collaborators
Publish Date 2009
Book
Citation Gottfried, A. E., & Gottfried, A. W. (2009). Development of gifted motivation:    Longitudinal research and applications.  In L. Shavinina (Ed.), International   Handbook of Giftedness and Talent. Part 1, (pp. 617-631). Springer Science+Business Media.
Abstract

Distinctions

2011 Social Responsibility Award from the Western Psychological Association
Title Recipient of the 2011 Western Psychyological Association Social Responsibility Award
Collaborators
Publish Date 2011
Type Award from Professional Organization
Citation 2011 Social Responsibility Award from the Western Psychological Association
Abstract Dr. Gottfried's research has had an extensive impact on social policies relating to the well-being of children and their families in two areas. With regard to the role of maternal and dual-earner employment and children's development, "The findings from her studies served as a basis for a landmark Supreme Court ruling which prohibits the judiciary from using a parents' employment in a child custody determination." With regard to her research on academic intrinsic motivation and children's academic success, the scale she developed, the Children's Academic Intrinsic Motivation Inventory, "has been translated into numerous languages so as to be used internationally. It is used by school districts and state education programs to assess children who have difficulties in learning as well as to assess mtivation among gifted students." "Very few developmental psychologists have had such an enormous impact on practical applications of research in the schools."
Outstanding Faculty Award, CSUN
Title Outstanding Faculty Award, CSUN
Collaborators
Publish Date 2009
Type
Citation Outstanding Faculty Award, CSUN
Abstract

Books

Hudley, C. and Gottfried, A. E. (Eds.), (2008). Academic motivation and the culture of school in childhood and adolescence. NY: Oxford Press.
Title Academic motivation and the culture of school in childhood and adolescence..
Collaborators
Publish Date 2008
Citation Hudley, C. and Gottfried, A. E. (Eds.), (2008). Academic motivation and the culture of school in childhood and adolescence. NY: Oxford Press.
Abstract The chapters in this book examne motivation with students of various ethnicities, languages, ages, achievement levels, and social classes, and attend to academic motivation in these different contexts. Goal of the book is to create a more comprehensive and integrated perspective on the multiple dimensions of school culture in the United States.

Faculty

ED 3132


MailDrop: 91330-8265


adele.gottfried@csun.edu

P: 818-677-2032


F: 818-677-2544