Dr. Lissa D. Stapleton is an assistant professor in Deaf Studies and core faculty in the Educational Leadership and Policy Studies program. She was born and raised in Columbus, Ohio. Stapleton attended Wright State University and graduated with a Bachelors degree in Social Work and a minor in African and African-American Studies. Highly involved as an undergraduate, she was encouraged to continue her education at the University of Dayton. She graduated in 2006 with a Masters in Science and Education in College Student Personnel. Once graduated, Stapleton worked as a Community Director in Residence Life at California State University, Northridge and as a Spirituality Living Learning Specialist for Semester at Sea. Through her residential life work with the Lighthouse Living Learning community, international service work with the Deaf Jamaican and Ghanaian communities, and scholarly curiosity on ways to better support Deaf college students' lives, Stapleton decided to pursue her doctorate at Iowa State University. Stapleton graduated in 2014 with her Ph.D. in Education with an emphasis in Higher Education and Social Justice and a minor in Women's Studies. She won the 2015 Melvene D. Hardee NASPA Dissertation of the Year award, was a 2018 Ford Postdoctoral Fellow and is a 2019 Nancy Weiss Malkiel Fellow. Stapleton loves dancing, movies, traveling and spending time friends and family.

  • Ph.D. 2014, Iowa State University
  • M.S.E 2006, University of Dayton
  • B.S. 2002, Wright State University

    This person has not added any Research Interests.


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Articles

Bhavsar, G.P., Grote, K.G., Galvan, M.C., Tyutina, S.V., Guan, S.A., Stapleton, L.D., & Knotts, G. (2018). Evaluation of first-year faculty learning communities on teaching effectiveness and scholarship: An exploratory study. Journal of Faculty Development, 32(2), 1-8. 
Title Evaluation of first-year faculty learning communities on teaching effectiveness and scholarship: An exploratory study.
Collaborators Bhavsar, G.P., Grote, K.G., Galvan, M.C., Tyutina, S.V., Guan, S.A., & Knotts, G.
Publish Date 2018
Journal Journal of Faculty Development
Citation Bhavsar, G.P., Grote, K.G., Galvan, M.C., Tyutina, S.V., Guan, S.A., Stapleton, L.D., & Knotts, G. (2018). Evaluation of first-year faculty learning communities on teaching effectiveness and scholarship: An exploratory study. Journal of Faculty Development, 32(2), 1-8. 
Abstract Faculty in their early careers discover unique and unanticipated concerns in navigating academia and attempting to create life balance.  These needs must be addressed to ensure retention and success in the tenure process.  This exploratory study found the creation of first-year faculty learning communities (FLCs) provides needed, integral, and engaging support to encourage balance in teaching effectiveness, scholarship, and service and to increase confidence in comprehending a university’s tenure process.  More broadly, offices of faculty development on university campuses should prioritize long-term, evidence-based support to assist new faculty as they transition into the demands of a tenure-track position.
Peña, E., Stapleton, L.D., Brown, K., Stygles, K., Broido, E., & Rankin, S. (2018). Scholarship and Assessment of Disability Experiences in Higher Education: Emerging Perspectives.  College Student Affairs Journal, 36(2), 1-14.
Title Scholarship and Assessment of Disability Experiences in Higher Education: Emerging Perspectives
Collaborators Edlyn Peña, Kirsten Brown, Katie Stygles, Ellen Broido, & Sue Rankin
Publish Date 2018
Journal College Student Affairs Journal
Citation Peña, E., Stapleton, L.D., Brown, K., Stygles, K., Broido, E., & Rankin, S. (2018). Scholarship and Assessment of Disability Experiences in Higher Education: Emerging Perspectives.  College Student Affairs Journal, 36(2), 1-14.
Abstract Research on the experiences of college students with disabilities and the extent to which student affairs practitioners and scholars are meeting their needs is sparse.  This article advances the concept of Universal Research Design (URD) by discussing the application of universal design principles to research on college students. Four critical considerations that student affairs practitioners and scholars should address when conducting disability re-search include: (a) language and operational definitions, (b) accessing par-ticipants, (c) data collection for both qualitative and quantitative research, and (d) researcher’s positionality and just representation.  We demonstrate how URD can be used to make research on students with disabilities more inclusive, accessible, and accommodating.  
Stapleton, L., & Croom, N.N. (2017). Narratives of Black d/Deaf college alum: Reflections on intersecting microaggressions in college. Journal of Student Affairs, Research and Practice, 54(1), 15-27.
Title Narratives of Black d/Deaf College Alum: Reflecting on Intersecting Microaggressions in College
Collaborators Natasha Croom
Publish Date 2017
Journal The Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice
Citation Stapleton, L., & Croom, N.N. (2017). Narratives of Black d/Deaf college alum: Reflections on intersecting microaggressions in college. Journal of Student Affairs, Research and Practice, 54(1), 15-27.
Abstract There is limited research on the experiences of Black d/Deaf (Bd/Deaf) students, and a historical legacy of discrimination. The purpose of this paper is to move minoritized communities’ stories, Bd/Deaf college graduates, from the margins to the center addressing the ways they experience racist and audist microaggressions as undergraduate students. Using Critical Race Theory and Critical Deaf Theory, the findings show how educators contribute to how Bd/Deaf students experienced microaggressions as invisibility and trivialization. 
Stapleton, L.D. (2017). Audism and racism: The hidden curriculum impacting Black d/Deaf college students in the classroom. The Negro Educational Review, 67(1-4), 149-168.
Title Audism and racism: The hidden curriculum impacting Black d/Deaf college students in the classroom
Collaborators
Publish Date 2017
Journal The Negro Educational Review Fayetteville State University
Publisher Fayetteville State University
Citation Stapleton, L.D. (2017). Audism and racism: The hidden curriculum impacting Black d/Deaf college students in the classroom. The Negro Educational Review, 67(1-4), 149-168.
Abstract There is a historical legacy of dual discrimination and institutional oppression against Black d/Deaf students within the educational system. This oppression has manifested itself in many ways including in the classroom as the hidden curriculum (i.e., the unattended outcomes of the schooling process). The purpose of this hermeneutic phenomenological study is to understand the ways in which racism and audism might still contribute to the hidden curriculum in the college classroom and how Black d/Deaf college students resist this oppression. The theoretical frameworks of Critical Race Theory and Critical Deaf Theory along with the analytical frameworks, theory of microaggressions and Black Deaf Community Cultural Wealth guide the data collection and analysis. The findings are presented as an inverted counternarrative showing how students experience issues of audism and racism through faculty’s non-diverse curriculum, hearing-centric evaluation methods, and racist and audist faculty-student interactions. The study concludes with practical recommendations for faculty. 
Peña, E., Stapleton, L., & Schaffer, L. (2016). Critical disability student development Theory. New Directions of Student Affairs, 154, 85-96. doi:10.1002/ss.20177
Title Critical Disability Student Development Theory.
Collaborators Edlyn Peña and & Lenore Schaffer
Publish Date 2016
Journal New Directions of Student Affairs
Citation Peña, E., Stapleton, L., & Schaffer, L. (2016). Critical disability student development Theory. New Directions of Student Affairs, 154, 85-96. doi:10.1002/ss.20177
Abstract The authors examine the social construction of language, labels, and knowledge associated with disabilities, arguing in favor of critical and intersectional perspectives on disability identity.
Gillon, K. & Stapleton, L.D. (2015). Your story ain’t got nothin to do with me? The experiences of Black female faculty who mentor White female students. Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education and Student Affairs, 1(1), 35-49.
Title Your story ain’t got nothin to do with me? The experiences of Black female faculty who mentor White female students
Collaborators Kathleen Gillon
Publish Date 2015
Journal Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education and Student Affairs Loyola University Chicago
Publisher Loyola University Chicago
Citation Gillon, K. & Stapleton, L.D. (2015). Your story ain’t got nothin to do with me? The experiences of Black female faculty who mentor White female students. Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education and Student Affairs, 1(1), 35-49.
Abstract Previous literature on mentoring, specifically that of cross-cultural mentoring, has provided some insight into the intricacy of race in mentoring. However, much of this literature has focused on the mentoring relationship of a White individual mentoring a person of color. This qualitative inquiry critically explores the experiences of six Black female faculty who have mentored White female students in higher education graduate programs, focusing specifically on how they enter into these cross-cultural mentoring relationships. Using Black feminist thought, our findings suggest that while individual Black faculty may have unique experiences entering into mentoring relationships with White female students, a Black feminist standpoint does exist. These faculty members entered into the relationships cautiously and with thought, responding emotionally to the idea of mentoring White students, and screening the students, before formalizing the relationship via a student-centered approach. The findings from this study serve as a starting point in which to better understand faculty of color’s experiences mentoring White students as well as provide implications for both faculty and students who may enter into such a relationship.
Stapleton, L.D. (2015). The disabled academy: The experiences of Deaf faculty at predominantly hearing institutions. The National Education Association. 31(2). http://www.nea.org/home/65438.htm


Title The Disabled Academy: The Experiences of Deaf Faculty at Predominantly Hearing Institutions
Collaborators
Publish Date 2015
Journal Though and Action The National Education Association
Publisher The National Education Association
Citation Stapleton, L.D. (2015). The disabled academy: The experiences of Deaf faculty at predominantly hearing institutions. The National Education Association. 31(2). http://www.nea.org/home/65438.htm


Abstract There is a historical and current legacy of oppression against Deaf and hard of hearing people in the U.S. Many individuals believe that deafness is a deficiency that needs to be fixed.  This type of attitude has affected the type of academic environments many Deaf people encounter on campuses today.  Perpetuated hearing-dominant ways of being and space have influenced how Deaf faculty survive and thrive within the academy.  This theoretical paper addresses the challenges Deaf faculty experience at predominantly hearing institutions.  Three main questions were addressed (a) What experiences are Deaf faculty having at predominantly hearing insitutitions?  (b) How can spatial theory help us understand the experiences of Deaf faculty?  (c) How are Deaf faculty experiences affecting the larger higher education community?
Stapleton, L.D. (2015). When being deaf is centered: d/Deaf students of color navigating Deaf and racial identity in college. Journal of College Student Development, 56(6), p. 570-586.
Title When being deaf is centered: d/Deaf students of color navigating Deaf and racial identity in college
Collaborators
Publish Date 2015
Journal Journal of College Student Development The John Hopkins University Press
Publisher The John Hopkins University Press
Citation Stapleton, L.D. (2015). When being deaf is centered: d/Deaf students of color navigating Deaf and racial identity in college. Journal of College Student Development, 56(6), p. 570-586.
Abstract Approximately 30% of d/Deaf students are successfully completing college; the reasons for such a low graduation rate is unknown (Destler & Buckly, 2011). Most research on d/Deaf college students lack racial/ethnic diversity within the study; thus, it is unclear how d/Deaf Students of Color are faring in higher education or what experiences they are having. It is no longer appropriate or socially just to conduct research that does not intentionally seek out the voices of d/Deaf Students of Color. Using a fundamental descriptive qualitative methodology, this paper sheds light on a population of students, d/Deaf Women of Color, who are often invisible within the mainstream higher education literature and expands our understand of the types of experiences they are having related to their racial/ethnic and d/Deaf identity while attending college.

Assistant Professor

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