Nathan R. Durdella is an associate professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at California State University, Northridge (CSUN), where he teaches graduate-level courses in action research, academic planning, and qualitative research methods and advises students in the doctoral program.

  • Ph.D. 2006, University of California Los Angeles
  • M.A. 2003, University of California Los Angeles
  • M.A. 2000, University of California Los Angeles
  • B.A. 1998, University of California Los Angeles

Research Interest data is currently not available.


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Articles

Title Exploring Latino/a college students’ transition experiences: An ethnography of social preparedness and familial support
Collaborators Michel, R. & Durdella, N.
Publish Date 2018
Journal Journal of Latinos and Education
Citation
Abstract
Korgan, C, & Durdella N.  (2016, April).  Examining capacity for meaning-making in relation to educational resilience in first-year, full-time college students.  Journal of The First-Year Experience & Students in Transition, 28(1).   
Title Examining capacity for meaning-making in relation to educational resilience in first-year, full-time college students.
Collaborators Korgan, C
Publish Date 2015
Journal Journal of The First-Year Experience & Students in Transition
Citation Korgan, C, & Durdella N.  (2016, April).  Examining capacity for meaning-making in relation to educational resilience in first-year, full-time college students.  Journal of The First-Year Experience & Students in Transition, 28(1).   
Abstract
Korgan, C., Durdella, N., & Stevens, M.  (2013).  The development of academic self-efficacy among first-year college students in a comprehensive public university.  Higher Education in Review 10, 11-37.
Title The development of academic self-efficacy among first-year college students in a comprehensive public university.
Collaborators Korgan, C., Stevens, M.
Publish Date 2013
Journal Higher Education in Review
Citation Korgan, C., Durdella, N., & Stevens, M.  (2013).  The development of academic self-efficacy among first-year college students in a comprehensive public university.  Higher Education in Review 10, 11-37.
Abstract
Durdella, N. R., & Kim, Y. K. (2012). Understanding patterns of college outcomes among student veterans. Journal of Studies in Education, 2(2), 109-129.    
Title Understanding patterns of college outcomes among student veterans.
Collaborators Kim, Y. K.
Publish Date 2012
Journal Journal of Studies in Education
Citation Durdella, N. R., & Kim, Y. K. (2012). Understanding patterns of college outcomes among student veterans. Journal of Studies in Education, 2(2), 109-129.    
Abstract
Sheldon, C.Q., & Durdella, N.R. (2010, January-February). Success rates for students taking compressed and regular length developmental courses in the community college. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 34(1/2), 39-54.
Title Success rates for students taking compressed and regular length developmental courses in the community college
Collaborators
Publish Date 2010
Journal Community College Journal of Research and Practice Routledge
Publisher Routledge
Citation Sheldon, C.Q., & Durdella, N.R. (2010, January-February). Success rates for students taking compressed and regular length developmental courses in the community college. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 34(1/2), 39-54.
Abstract In recent years, developmental education in the community colleges has received much attention. However, there has been little research examining the relationship between course length and course success in developmental education. Using historical enrollment data from a large, suburban community college in southern California, this study examines the relationship between course length and course success in developmental education when social and academic background characteristics are controlled. The study hypothesized that there would be no significant or practical difference in success rates for students taking compressed (i.e., courses less than eight weeks in length) or regular length developmental English, reading, or math courses when social or academic characteristics are controlled. Results demonstrate that developmental course length was associated with statistically and practically significant differences in course success observed across all categories of age, gender, and ethnicity. Students enrolled in compressed-format courses were more likely to succeed than students enrolled in regular-length courses. Higher successful course completion rates for compressed courses were observed across all departments, with the highest successful course completion rates in eight week format in English. Further, students—irrespective of age, race, or gender—were more likely to successfully complete compressed format courses than their counterparts in regular length courses. Findings point to an educational benefit for students who enroll in compressed courses. Future research in this area includes an examination of students’ progress through a sequence of developmental education courses and a look into the effect of college experience and environment factors related to success in compressed courses.
Durdella, N.R. (2010, Spring). Evaluations that respond: Prescription, application, and implications of responsive evaluation theory for community college instructional support programs. Journal of Applied Research in the Community College 17(2), 13-23.
Title Evaluations that respond: Prescription, application, and implications of responsive evaluation theory for community college instructional support programs
Collaborators
Publish Date 2010
Journal Journal of Applied Research in the Community College New Forums Press
Publisher New Forums Press
Citation Durdella, N.R. (2010, Spring). Evaluations that respond: Prescription, application, and implications of responsive evaluation theory for community college instructional support programs. Journal of Applied Research in the Community College 17(2), 13-23.
Abstract This study examines two community college instructional support programs to explore the effectiveness of an evaluation model—responsive evaluation theory—that may ease the tensions between a concern over programs’ processes and reporting requirements for program outcomes. The study uses a comparative qualitative case study design and applies responsive evaluation’s prescriptive steps to assess the research questions: How effectively does responsive evaluation theory operate as an evaluation model? How does responsive evaluation theory articulate with systematic evaluation theories? Results indicate that responsive evaluation can be an effective model if evaluators consult program faculty and staff, who in turn express an interest in building a collaborative evaluation, and if the purpose of the evaluation is to examine process-oriented issues. Results further indicate that responsive and systematic evaluation models articulate well in that outcomes-oriented issues can be examined within the context of a responsive evaluation. Finally, results demonstrate that the responsive evaluation process can be highly politicized and, consequently, addresses the concerns of stakeholders to varying degrees.

Chapters

Title Understanding Leadership with Women Community College Executives
Collaborators Hawa Ghaus-Kelley
Publish Date 2017
Book Surviving Sexism in Academia: Feminist Strategies for Leadership Routledge
Publisher Routledge
Citation
Abstract

Books

Title Qualitative dissertation methodology: A guide for research design and methods
Collaborators
Publish Date 2018
SAGE Publications, Inc
Publisher SAGE Publications, Inc
Citation
Abstract Qualitative Dissertation Methodology: A Guide for Research Design and Methods functions as a dissertation advisor to help students construct and write a qualitative methodological framework for their research. Drawing from the challenges author Nathan Durdella has experienced while supervising students, the book breaks down producing the dissertation chapter into smaller pieces and goes through each portion of the methodology process step by step. With a warm and supportive tone, he walks students through the process from the very start, from choosing chairs and developing qualitative support networks to outlining the qualitative chapter and delving into the writing. By the end of the book, students will have completed the most challenging chapter of a qualitative dissertation and laid a strong foundation for the rest of their dissertation work.